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DEXA Scans

A bone density scan is used to measure how much bone tissue you have. This is known as your bone density. You may also hear this test called a DXA (or DEXA) scan. You may self refer for a bone density scan, or have it recommended by a health care professional if: you have broken a bone or bones easily you have symptoms of spinal fractures you have risk factors for osteoporosis and broken bones your doctor needs to reassess your bone health and risk of breaking a bone, such as at a medication review Loss of bone density is normal as we age. Women, however, when they are perimenopausal have an increased rate at which their bone density decreases. This can be exacerbated by environmental factors, lifestyle choices, genetics and long-term medication or drug use.

Our DEXA Scan Practitioners

Patient-centred healthcare to improve your quality of life
93 Lynn Rd, Downham Market, PE38 9QE
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Initially the consultation requires some case history questions that are related to bone density and contraindications. The Dexa scan itself takes only around 5 minutes. It requires you to remove all jewellery from your non-dominant arm and hand, sit comfortably for those 5 minutes with that hand and forearm in the scanner and to keep the arm and hand still while the machine is scanning. We will then go through the results with you and discuss the significance of them. We can decide at this point to contact your GP and other relevant health care providers if necessary. We also can give advice regarding supplements and diet, exercise dos and don’ts and any other queries you may have. T-score Results are given as a 'standard deviation', which is the number of units above or below the average bone density of a young and healthy person. This is known as your 'T-score'. Whatever score you receive, your risk of breaking a bone increases as you grow older. By the age of 75, 50% of the population has a bone density in the osteoporosis range. What your T-score means +1 to -1 - Your bone density is in the normal range for a young and healthy person. -1 to -2.5 - Your bone density is slightly below the normal range for a young and healthy person, also known as osteopenia. -2.5 and below - Your bone density is in the osteoporosis range. If your T-score is in the osteoporosis range, it doesn't always need to be a cause for concern. It doesn't necessarily mean you will break a bone, or need a treatment. Having low bone density is one risk factor for osteoporosis and broken bones. Your results from this test are usually used alongside a fracture risk assessment, which takes these other risk factors into account. Z-score You will be given your results as a Z-score, alongside your T-score if you are under 72 years of age. A Z-score compares your bone density to people of the same age as you. Having a low Z score may indicate that another condition or medicine is affecting your bone density levels. For more information please visit The Royal Osteoperosis Society
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Clare is a structural osteopath, and has experience in craniosacral osteopathy, visceral osteopathy, functional and harmonic techniques to suit the individual patient needs.
More about Clare More about Clare More about Clare

Clare Finch

Clare is a structural osteopath, and has experience in craniosacral osteopathy, visceral osteopathy, functional and harmonic techniques to suit the individual patient needs.
More about Clare More about Clare More about Clare

Clare Finch

Our Multidisciplinary Team are Here to Offer You the Most Efficient and Effective

Diagnosis and Treatment Plan Suited to Your Needs and Optimal Wellbeing

Book an appointment Book an appointment
A bone density scan is used to measure how much bone tissue you have. This is known as your bone density. You may also hear this test called a DXA (or DEXA) scan. You may self refer for a bone density scan, or have it recommended by a health care professional if: you have broken a bone or bones easily you have symptoms of spinal fractures you have risk factors for osteoporosis and broken bones your doctor needs to reassess your bone health and risk of breaking a bone, such as at a medication review Loss of bone density is normal as we age. Women, however, when they are perimenopausal have an increased rate at which their bone density decreases. This can be exacerbated by environmental factors, lifestyle choices, genetics and long-term medication or drug use.

DEXA Scans

Our DEXA Scan

Practitioners

Initially the consultation requires some case history questions that are related to bone density and contraindications. The Dexa scan itself takes only around 5 minutes. It requires you to remove all jewellery from your non- dominant arm and hand, sit comfortably for those 5 minutes with that hand and forearm in the scanner and to keep the arm and hand still while the machine is scanning. We will then go through the results with you and discuss the significance of them. We can decide at this point to contact your GP and other relevant health care providers if necessary. We also can give advice regarding supplements and diet, exercise dos and don’ts and any other queries you may have. T-score Results are given as a 'standard deviation', which is the number of units above or below the average bone density of a young and healthy person. This is known as your 'T-score'. Whatever score you receive, your risk of breaking a bone increases as you grow older. By the age of 75, 50% of the population has a bone density in the osteopo-rosis range. What your T-score means +1 to -1 - Your bone density is in the normal range for a young and healthy person. -1 to -2.5 - Your bone density is slightly below the normal range for a young and healthy person, also known as osteopenia. -2.5 and below - Your bone density is in the osteoporosis range. If your T-score is in the osteoporosis range, it doesn't always need to be a cause for concern. It doesn't necessarily mean you will break a bone, or need a treatment. Hav-ing low bone density is one risk factor for osteoporosis and broken bones. Your results from this test are usually used alongside a fracture risk assessment, which takes these other risk factors into account. Z-score You will be given your results as a Z-score, alongside your T-score if you are under 72 years of age. A Z-score compares your bone density to people of the same age as you. Having a low Z score may indicate that another condition or medicine is affecting your bone density levels. For more information please visit The Royal Osteoperosis Society
93 Lynn Rd, Downham Market, PE38 9QE
Visit Us
Contact Us
Patient-centred healthcare to improve your quality of life
93 Lynn Rd, Downham Market, PE38 9QE
Visit Us
Contact Us
Clare is a structural osteopath, and has experience in craniosacral osteopathy, visceral osteopathy, functional and harmonic techniques to suit the individual patient needs.
More about Clare More about Clare

Clare Finch

Book Now Book Now

Our Multidisciplinary Team

are Here to Offer You the

Most Efficient and Effective

Diagnosis and Treatment

Plan Suited to Your Needs

and Optimal Wellbeing